Vintage Kashigata: Traditional Hand Carved Wooden Confectionary Molds

Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Two part kashigata (sweet cake molds) with the top covers off to best show the carvings
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
The same two part molds with the tops covers on

Little sweet cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using these hand carved wooden culinary molds, or ‘Kashigata’. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition in Japan for more than 300 years. 
Like many centuries-old Japanese specialty craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. There is rare demand now for the handmade cakes, and so these artisanal culinary tools have joined the ranks of rapidly disappearing objects of times past. As they are becoming harder to find, they have become quite collectable. They are each one-of-a-kind hand carvings. 
The mold making process begins with preparing or seasoning the wood – most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving to prevent cracking and warping. For generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets.

Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Longevity motif molds – Crane, Bamboo, Lobster

Auspicious symbols play a significant role in Japanese culture. Kashigata are carved into motifs that have specific meaning and purpose. A few shown in our collection are: Longevity – such as Cranes (mythically lives a thousand years), Pine Trees (evergreen) and Lobster (rounded back like the elderly); Bamboo symbolizes Perserverance – the perfect combination of strength and flexibility. The Lotus (images below) stands for Purity and Enlightenment, as such elegance blooms out of the depths of muck and mud. Other motifs have seasonal references while others reflect the changing zeitgeist of different times and eras in history.
Molded sweet cakes are used for weddings, births, new years and other festivities as well as for funerals and more somber events.

Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Lotus seed pod and lotus leaf. The Lotus plant symbolizes purity, prosperity and enlightenment.

The following are individual images with pricing.

Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
The Lobster symbolizes Longevity – the bend in its back is like the hunching over of the elderly. $150.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Lotus Seed Pod – The lotus flower is revered in Japan for its ability to rise from the dirty, murky waters to bloom into a beautiful pure flower. This process symbolizes attaining enlightenment. $190.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
The lotus leaf, like the flower (above) symbolizes purity and enlightenment $130.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Flowers often symbolize joy and rejuvenation $75.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
The Crane motif is a symbol of longevity and good fortune. $130.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
The Crane symbolizes longevity and good fortune. $280.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Bamboo is a symbol of perseverance and prosperity, strength and flexibility, and good luck. $110.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Lotus buds in a pond. The lotus symbolizes purity and enlightenment. As the beautiful delicate flowers grow out of the mud in the bottom of the pond. $290.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Japanese fan design depicting a pine tree – Pine or evergreen is symbolic of longevity and endurance $250.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Japanese fan – An open fan symbolizes widening of wealth $175.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Three food storage Jars $150.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Japanese Flag $120.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Japanese drum with tassels $210.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Food bowl $120.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Food bowl $75.

Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found independantly in many countries around the world. Each culture’s style is unique and the Kashitgata molds are specific to Japan. A few examples from around the world are: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’. There are many more examples and a vast range of motifs, uses and meanings.
Beyond their use as tools to make little molded cakes, Japanese Kashigata are wonderful little works of art and history. Please ask us for more information and to see the rest of our collection.


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