Vintage Kashigata: Traditional Hand Carved Wooden Confectionary Molds

Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Two part kashigata (sweet cake molds) with the top covers off to best show the carvings
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
The same two part molds with the tops covers on

Little sweet cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using these hand carved wooden culinary molds, or ‘Kashigata’. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition in Japan for more than 300 years. 
Like many centuries-old Japanese specialty craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. There is rare demand now for the handmade cakes, and so these artisanal culinary tools have joined the ranks of rapidly disappearing objects of times past. As they are becoming harder to find, they have become quite collectable. They are each one-of-a-kind hand carvings. 
The mold making process begins with preparing or seasoning the wood – most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving to prevent cracking and warping. For generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets.

Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Longevity motif molds – Crane, Bamboo, Lobster

Auspicious symbols play a significant role in Japanese culture. Kashigata are carved into motifs that have specific meaning and purpose. A few shown in our collection are: Longevity – such as Cranes (mythically lives a thousand years), Pine Trees (evergreen) and Lobster (rounded back like the elderly); Bamboo symbolizes Perserverance – the perfect combination of strength and flexibility. The Lotus (images below) stands for Purity and Enlightenment, as such elegance blooms out of the depths of muck and mud. Other motifs have seasonal references while others reflect the changing zeitgeist of different times and eras in history.
Molded sweet cakes are used for weddings, births, new years and other festivities as well as for funerals and more somber events.

Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Lotus seed pod and lotus leaf. The Lotus plant symbolizes purity, prosperity and enlightenment.

The following are individual images with pricing.

Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
The Lobster symbolizes Longevity – the bend in its back is like the hunching over of the elderly. $150.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Lotus Seed Pod – The lotus flower is revered in Japan for its ability to rise from the dirty, murky waters to bloom into a beautiful pure flower. This process symbolizes attaining enlightenment. $190.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
The lotus leaf, like the flower (above) symbolizes purity and enlightenment $130.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Flowers often symbolize joy and rejuvenation $75.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
The Crane motif is a symbol of longevity and good fortune. $130.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
The Crane symbolizes longevity and good fortune. $280.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Bamboo is a symbol of perseverance and prosperity, strength and flexibility, and good luck. $110.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Lotus buds in a pond. The lotus symbolizes purity and enlightenment. As the beautiful delicate flowers grow out of the mud in the bottom of the pond. $290.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Japanese fan design depicting a pine tree – Pine or evergreen is symbolic of longevity and endurance $250.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Japanese fan – An open fan symbolizes widening of wealth $175.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Three food storage Jars $150.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Japanese Flag $120.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Japanese drum with tassels $210.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Food bowl $120.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Food bowl $75.

Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found independantly in many countries around the world. Each culture’s style is unique and the Kashitgata molds are specific to Japan. A few examples from around the world are: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’. There are many more examples and a vast range of motifs, uses and meanings.
Beyond their use as tools to make little molded cakes, Japanese Kashigata are wonderful little works of art and history. Please ask us for more information and to see the rest of our collection.

Tanuki 狸 – The Shape-shifting Prankster Icon of Wealth and Generosity

Shigaraki Tanuki, Tanuki have a very complex and interesting folkloric history. While largely unheard of in the states, Tanuki have been among the most significant characters in Japan since ancient times. Contemporary Tanuki are primarily a welcoming symbol of prosperity. In the mid 20th century the character was adapted, both visually and symbolically, to suit modern culture and, although they retain much of their prankster persona from the original 16th century creatures, they are much more benign. They have a long list of supernatural powers, most notable shape-shifting. Ancient Tanuki, humorously portrayed in block prints are now mostly found in museums and private collections. Tanuki statues are often found in restaurant or shop windows and outside temples. Famous for getting drunk and not paying their bills, they are usually portrayed wearing a straw hat and carrying a flask of sake and a ledger of promissory notes. Thus they can also serve as cautionary figures against the hazards of overindulging in alcohol. They always have big bellies and humorously large testicles which they use as drums. 16 1/2" x 13" x 10 1/2", $450., thedavidalancollection.com , solana beach, ca
Tanuki, Vintage Shigaraki Ceramic, 16 1/2″ x 13″ x 10 1/2″, $450.

Tanuki have a complex and interesting folkloric history. Although largely unknown in the states, they have been among the most significant characters in Japan since the 16th century.

Contemporary Tanuki are creatures of wealth and whimsy; symbols of prosperity seen outside many temples, shops and restaurants. These vintage statues of modern day Tanuki were designed by Shigaraki potter, Tetsuzo Fujiwara, in the early 1950s (Showa Era). They embody these 8 virtues:
1 Big Hat = protection against trouble
2 Big Eyes = perception for decisions
3 Sake Bottle = virtue
4 Big Tail = steadiness until wealth is attained
5 Big Testicles = financial luck
6 Promissory Note = trust
7 Big Belly = bold decisions
8 Friendly Smile

Tamer than their sinister supernatural ancestors, Tanuki are still magical shape-shifting pranksters that love to play tricks on people.

Shigaraki Tanuki Tea Pot, Tanuki have a very complex and interesting folkloric history. While largely unheard of in the states, Tanuki have been among the most significant characters in Japan since ancient times. Contemporary Tanuki are primarily a welcoming symbol of prosperity. In the mid 20th century the character was adapted, both visually and symbolically, to suit modern culture and, although they retain much of their prankster persona from the original 16th century creatures, they are much more benign. They have a long list of supernatural powers, most notable shape-shifting. Ancient Tanuki, humorously portrayed in block prints are now mostly found in museums and private collections. Tanuki statues are often found in restaurant or shop windows and outside temples. Famous for getting drunk and not paying their bills, they are usually portrayed wearing a straw hat and carrying a flask of sake and a ledger of promissory notes. Thus they can also serve as cautionary figures against the hazards of overindulging in alcohol. They always have big bellies and humorously large testicles which they use as drums. 10 1/2" x 11" x 10", $560. , thedavidalancollection.com , solana beach, ca
Tanuki Tea Pot, Vintage Shigaraki Ceramic, 10 1/2″ x 11″ x 10″,  $560.

Shape-shifted Tanuki illustrating a popular Edo period Folktale (abreviated)
A farmer rescued a Tanuki from a trap and, in gratitude, it transformed into a teapot that he could sell to get money as a thanks for the favor. When the buyer used his new purchase, the tanuki couldn’t stand the heat, so the kettle sprouted a head and legs and tail and ran away.

Shigaraki Tanuki Jug, Tanuki have a very complex and interesting folkloric history. While largely unheard of in the states, Tanuki have been among the most significant characters in Japan since ancient times. Contemporary Tanuki are primarily a welcoming symbol of prosperity. In the mid 20th century the character was adapted, both visually and symbolically, to suit modern culture and, although they retain much of their prankster persona from the original 16th century creatures, they are much more benign. They have a long list of supernatural powers, most notable shape-shifting. Ancient Tanuki, humorously portrayed in block prints are now mostly found in museums and private collections. Tanuki statues are often found in restaurant or shop windows and outside temples. Famous for getting drunk and not paying their bills, they are usually portrayed wearing a straw hat and carrying a flask of sake and a ledger of promissory notes. Thus they can also serve as cautionary figures against the hazards of overindulging in alcohol. They always have big bellies and humorously large testicles which they use as drums. 9" x 11", $425. , thedavidalancollection.com , solana beach, ca
Tanuki Jug, Vintage Shigaraki Ceramic,  9″ x 11″, $425.   – another Example of a shape-shifted trickster

In their normal state Tanuki have big bellies and humorously large testicles which they like to use as drums.
Most often portrayed wearing large straw hats and carrying a flask of sake in one hand and a ledger or purse of promissory notes in the other, they can also serve as cautionary figures against the hazards of getting drunk and not paying the tab.

Shigaraki Tanuki, Tanuki have a very complex and interesting folkloric history. While largely unheard of in the states, Tanuki have been among the most significant characters in Japan since ancient times. Contemporary Tanuki are primarily a welcoming symbol of prosperity. In the mid 20th century the character was adapted, both visually and symbolically, to suit modern culture and, although they retain much of their prankster persona from the original 16th century creatures, they are much more benign. They have a long list of supernatural powers, most notable shape-shifting. Ancient Tanuki, humorously portrayed in block prints are now mostly found in museums and private collections. Tanuki statues are often found in restaurant or shop windows and outside temples. Famous for getting drunk and not paying their bills, they are usually portrayed wearing a straw hat and carrying a flask of sake and a ledger of promissory notes. Thus they can also serve as cautionary figures against the hazards of overindulging in alcohol. They always have big bellies and humorously large testicles which they use as drums. 19 1/2" x 15" x 12 1/2", $675., thedavidalancollection.com , solana beach, ca
Tanuki, Vintage Shigaraki Ceramic, 19 1/2″ x 15″ x 12 1/2″, $675

Tanuki have adapted visually and symbolically to suit modern culture. The anthropomorphized creatures are a departure from their original liminal manifestation. They continue to thrive in modern folklore.
…Keep reading after the images for a more detailed history and origins of ancient Tanuki folklore – it’s pretty wild.

Shigaraki Tanuki, Tanuki have a very complex and interesting folkloric history. While largely unheard of in the states, Tanuki have been among the most significant characters in Japan since ancient times. Contemporary Tanuki are primarily a welcoming symbol of prosperity. In the mid 20th century the character was adapted, both visually and symbolically, to suit modern culture and, although they retain much of their prankster persona from the original 16th century creatures, they are much more benign. They have a long list of supernatural powers, most notable shape-shifting. Ancient Tanuki, humorously portrayed in block prints are now mostly found in museums and private collections. Tanuki statues are often found in restaurant or shop windows and outside temples. Famous for getting drunk and not paying their bills, they are usually portrayed wearing a straw hat and carrying a flask of sake and a ledger of promissory notes. Thus they can also serve as cautionary figures against the hazards of overindulging in alcohol. They always have big bellies and humorously large testicles which they use as drums. 15 1/2" x 9" x 8 1/2", $530., thedavidalancollection.com , solana beach, ca
Tanuki, Vintage Shigaraki Ceramic,  15 1/2″ x 9″ x 8 1/2″, $530.

Shigaraki Tanuki, Tanuki have a very complex and interesting folkloric history. While largely unheard of in the states, Tanuki have been among the most significant characters in Japan since ancient times. Contemporary Tanuki are primarily a welcoming symbol of prosperity. In the mid 20th century the character was adapted, both visually and symbolically, to suit modern culture and, although they retain much of their prankster persona from the original 16th century creatures, they are much more benign. They have a long list of supernatural powers, most notable shape-shifting. Ancient Tanuki, humorously portrayed in block prints are now mostly found in museums and private collections. Tanuki statues are often found in restaurant or shop windows and outside temples. Famous for getting drunk and not paying their bills, they are usually portrayed wearing a straw hat and carrying a flask of sake and a ledger of promissory notes. Thus they can also serve as cautionary figures against the hazards of overindulging in alcohol. They always have big bellies and humorously large testicles which they use as drums. 29" x 18" x 16", $1450., thedavidalancollection.com , solana beach, ca
Tanuki, Vintage Shigaraki Ceramic, 29″ x 18″ x 16″, $1450

Shigaraki Tanuki, Tanuki have a very complex and interesting folkloric history. While largely unheard of in the states, Tanuki have been among the most significant characters in Japan since ancient times. Contemporary Tanuki are primarily a welcoming symbol of prosperity. In the mid 20th century the character was adapted, both visually and symbolically, to suit modern culture and, although they retain much of their prankster persona from the original 16th century creatures, they are much more benign. They have a long list of supernatural powers, most notable shape-shifting. Ancient Tanuki, humorously portrayed in block prints are now mostly found in museums and private collections. Tanuki statues are often found in restaurant or shop windows and outside temples. Famous for getting drunk and not paying their bills, they are usually portrayed wearing a straw hat and carrying a flask of sake and a ledger of promissory notes. Thus they can also serve as cautionary figures against the hazards of overindulging in alcohol. They always have big bellies and humorously large testicles which they use as drums. 18 1/2" x 12" x 10 1/2"", $575., thedavidalancollection.com , solana beach, ca
Tanuki, Vintage Shigaraki Ceramic, 18 1/2″ x 12″ x 10 1/2″”, $575.

Shigaraki Female Tanuki, Most are male. Tanuki have a very complex and interesting folkloric history. While largely unheard of in the states, Tanuki have been among the most significant characters in Japan since ancient times. Contemporary Tanuki are primarily a welcoming symbol of prosperity. In the mid 20th century the character was adapted, both visually and symbolically, to suit modern culture and, although they retain much of their prankster persona from the original 16th century creatures, they are much more benign. They have a long list of supernatural powers, most notable shape-shifting. Ancient Tanuki, humorously portrayed in block prints are now mostly found in museums and private collections. Tanuki statues are often found in restaurant or shop windows and outside temples. Famous for getting drunk and not paying their bills, they are usually portrayed wearing a straw hat and carrying a flask of sake and a ledger of promissory notes. Thus they can also serve as cautionary figures against the hazards of overindulging in alcohol. They always have big bellies and humorously large testicles which they use as drums. (left - 14" x 8 1/2" x 9", $380.); (right - 15" x 9 1/2" x 8 1/2", $325.) thedavidalancollection.com , solana beach, ca
Two rare female Tanuki with bows and feathers, Vintage Shigaraki Ceramic (mid 20th century)                                                                      (left – 14″ x 8 1/2″ x 9″, $380.); (right – 15″ x 9 1/2″ x 8 1/2″, $325.)

Shigaraki Tanuki with green robe and feather, Tanuki have a very complex and interesting folkloric history. While largely unheard of in the states, Tanuki have been among the most significant characters in Japan since ancient times. Contemporary Tanuki are primarily a welcoming symbol of prosperity. In the mid 20th century the character was adapted, both visually and symbolically, to suit modern culture and, although they retain much of their prankster persona from the original 16th century creatures, they are much more benign. They have a long list of supernatural powers, most notable shape-shifting. Ancient Tanuki, humorously portrayed in block prints are now mostly found in museums and private collections. Tanuki statues are often found in restaurant or shop windows and outside temples. Famous for getting drunk and not paying their bills, they are usually portrayed wearing a straw hat and carrying a flask of sake and a ledger of promissory notes. Thus they can also serve as cautionary figures against the hazards of overindulging in alcohol. They always have big bellies and humorously large testicles which they use as drums. 18" x 12" x 13 1/2" x 12 1/2", $675., thedavidalancollection.com , solana beach, ca
Tanuki with feather wearing green kimono, Vintage Shigaraki Ceramic, 18″ x 12″ x 13 1/2″ x 12 1/2″, $675.

Shigaraki Tanuki, Tanuki have a very complex and interesting folkloric history. While largely unheard of in the states, Tanuki have been among the most significant characters in Japan since ancient times. Contemporary Tanuki are primarily a welcoming symbol of prosperity. In the mid 20th century the character was adapted, both visually and symbolically, to suit modern culture and, although they retain much of their prankster persona from the original 16th century creatures, they are much more benign. They have a long list of supernatural powers, most notable shape-shifting. Ancient Tanuki, humorously portrayed in block prints are now mostly found in museums and private collections. Tanuki statues are often found in restaurant or shop windows and outside temples. Famous for getting drunk and not paying their bills, they are usually portrayed wearing a straw hat and carrying a flask of sake and a ledger of promissory notes. Thus they can also serve as cautionary figures against the hazards of overindulging in alcohol. They always have big bellies and humorously large testicles which they use as drums. 15" x 10" x 9 1/2", $375., thedavidalancollection.com , solana beach, ca
Tanuki, Vintage Shigaraki Ceramic, 15″ x 10″ x 9 1/2″, $375.

Shigaraki Tanuki with Youngster, Tanuki have a very complex and interesting folkloric history. While largely unheard of in the states, Tanuki have been among the most significant characters in Japan since ancient times. Contemporary Tanuki are primarily a welcoming symbol of prosperity. In the mid 20th century the character was adapted, both visually and symbolically, to suit modern culture and, although they retain much of their prankster persona from the original 16th century creatures, they are much more benign. They have a long list of supernatural powers, most notable shape-shifting. Ancient Tanuki, humorously portrayed in block prints are now mostly found in museums and private collections. Tanuki statues are often found in restaurant or shop windows and outside temples. Famous for getting drunk and not paying their bills, they are usually portrayed wearing a straw hat and carrying a flask of sake and a ledger of promissory notes. Thus they can also serve as cautionary figures against the hazards of overindulging in alcohol. They always have big bellies and humorously large testicles which they use as drums. 15" x 10" x 7", $420., thedavidalancollection.com , solana beach, ca
Tanuki with youngster, Vintage Shigaraki Ceramic, 15″ x 10″ x 7″, $420.

detail of Tanuki with Youngster
ledger detail of Tanuki with Youngster

Shigaraki Tanuki wearing kimono, Tanuki have a very complex and interesting folkloric history. While largely unheard of in the states, Tanuki have been among the most significant characters in Japan since ancient times. Contemporary Tanuki are primarily a welcoming symbol of prosperity. In the mid 20th century the character was adapted, both visually and symbolically, to suit modern culture and, although they retain much of their prankster persona from the original 16th century creatures, they are much more benign. They have a long list of supernatural powers, most notable shape-shifting. Ancient Tanuki, humorously portrayed in block prints are now mostly found in museums and private collections. Tanuki statues are often found in restaurant or shop windows and outside temples. Famous for getting drunk and not paying their bills, they are usually portrayed wearing a straw hat and carrying a flask of sake and a ledger of promissory notes. Thus they can also serve as cautionary figures against the hazards of overindulging in alcohol. They always have big bellies and humorously large testicles which they use as drums. 8" x 10" x 9", $525., thedavidalancollection.com , solana beach, ca
Tanuki with fan wearing a kimono, signature stamp, Vintage Shigaraki Ceramics, 8″ x 10″ x 9″, $525.

Tanuki with a fan wearing a kimono, Vintage Shigaraki Ceramic, 19 1/2″ x 15″ x 12 1/2″, $675.

Shigaraki Tanuki, Tanuki have a very complex and interesting folkloric history. While largely unheard of in the states, Tanuki have been among the most significant characters in Japan since ancient times. Contemporary Tanuki are primarily a welcoming symbol of prosperity. In the mid 20th century the character was adapted, both visually and symbolically, to suit modern culture and, although they retain much of their prankster persona from the original 16th century creatures, they are much more benign. They have a long list of supernatural powers, most notable shape-shifting. Ancient Tanuki, humorously portrayed in block prints are now mostly found in museums and private collections. Tanuki statues are often found in restaurant or shop windows and outside temples. Famous for getting drunk and not paying their bills, they are usually portrayed wearing a straw hat and carrying a flask of sake and a ledger of promissory notes. Thus they can also serve as cautionary figures against the hazards of overindulging in alcohol. They always have big bellies and humorously large testicles which they use as drums. 22" x 12" x 12" x 11", $775., thedavidalancollection.com , solana beach, ca
Tanuki, Vintage Shigaraki Ceramic, 22″ x 12″ x 12″ x 11″, $775.

Shigaraki Tanuki, Tanuki have a very complex and interesting folkloric history. While largely unheard of in the states, Tanuki have been among the most significant characters in Japan since ancient times. Contemporary Tanuki are primarily a welcoming symbol of prosperity. In the mid 20th century the character was adapted, both visually and symbolically, to suit modern culture and, although they retain much of their prankster persona from the original 16th century creatures, they are much more benign. They have a long list of supernatural powers, most notable shape-shifting. Ancient Tanuki, humorously portrayed in block prints are now mostly found in museums and private collections. Tanuki statues are often found in restaurant or shop windows and outside temples. Famous for getting drunk and not paying their bills, they are usually portrayed wearing a straw hat and carrying a flask of sake and a ledger of promissory notes. Thus they can also serve as cautionary figures against the hazards of overindulging in alcohol. They always have big bellies and humorously large testicles which they use as drums. 18 1/2" x 11" x 11", $575., thedavidalancollection.com , solana beach, ca
Tanuki, Vintage Shigaraki Ceramic, 18 1/2″ x 11″ x 11″, $575.

Shigaraki Tanuki, (unglazed) Tanuki have a very complex and interesting folkloric history. While largely unheard of in the states, Tanuki have been among the most significant characters in Japan since ancient times. Contemporary Tanuki are primarily a welcoming symbol of prosperity. In the mid 20th century the character was adapted, both visually and symbolically, to suit modern culture and, although they retain much of their prankster persona from the original 16th century creatures, they are much more benign. They have a long list of supernatural powers, most notable shape-shifting. Ancient Tanuki, humorously portrayed in block prints are now mostly found in museums and private collections. Tanuki statues are often found in restaurant or shop windows and outside temples. Famous for getting drunk and not paying their bills, they are usually portrayed wearing a straw hat and carrying a flask of sake and a ledger of promissory notes. Thus they can also serve as cautionary figures against the hazards of overindulging in alcohol. They always have big bellies and humorously large testicles which they use as drums. 18" x 8 1/2" x 7 b1/2", $540., thedavidalancollection.com , solana beach, ca
Tanuki, Vintage Shigaraki Ceramic, 18″ x 8 1/2″ x 7 1/2″, $540.

Shigaraki Tanuki, (unglazed) Tanuki have a very complex and interesting folkloric history. While largely unheard of in the states, Tanuki have been among the most significant characters in Japan since ancient times. Contemporary Tanuki are primarily a welcoming symbol of prosperity. In the mid 20th century the character was adapted, both visually and symbolically, to suit modern culture and, although they retain much of their prankster persona from the original 16th century creatures, they are much more benign. They have a long list of supernatural powers, most notable shape-shifting. Ancient Tanuki, humorously portrayed in block prints are now mostly found in museums and private collections. Tanuki statues are often found in restaurant or shop windows and outside temples. Famous for getting drunk and not paying their bills, they are usually portrayed wearing a straw hat and carrying a flask of sake and a ledger of promissory notes. Thus they can also serve as cautionary figures against the hazards of overindulging in alcohol. They always have big bellies and humorously large testicles which they use as drums. 23 1/2" x 11 1/2" x 11", $675., thedavidalancollection.com , solana beach, ca
Tanuki, Vintage Shigaraki Ceramic, 23 1/2″ x 11 1/2″ x 11″, $675.

Shigaraki Tanuki, Tanuki have a very complex and interesting folkloric history. While largely unheard of in the states, Tanuki have been among the most significant characters in Japan since ancient times. Contemporary Tanuki are primarily a welcoming symbol of prosperity. In the mid 20th century the character was adapted, both visually and symbolically, to suit modern culture and, although they retain much of their prankster persona from the original 16th century creatures, they are much more benign. They have a long list of supernatural powers, most notable shape-shifting. Ancient Tanuki, humorously portrayed in block prints are now mostly found in museums and private collections. Tanuki statues are often found in restaurant or shop windows and outside temples. Famous for getting drunk and not paying their bills, they are usually portrayed wearing a straw hat and carrying a flask of sake and a ledger of promissory notes. Thus they can also serve as cautionary figures against the hazards of overindulging in alcohol. They always have big bellies and humorously large testicles which they use as drums. 37" x 19" x 16", $950., (chip in hat) thedavidalancollection.com , solana beach, ca
Tanuki, Vintage Shigaraki Ceramic, 37″ x 19″ x 16″, $950.

 Tanuki dressed as a monk, Tanuki have a very complex and interesting folkloric history. While largely unheard of in the states, Tanuki have been among the most significant characters in Japan since ancient times. Contemporary Tanuki are primarily a welcoming symbol of prosperity. In the mid 20th century the character was adapted, both visually and symbolically, to suit modern culture and, although they retain much of their prankster persona from the original 16th century creatures, they are much more benign. They have a long list of supernatural powers, most notable shape-shifting. Ancient Tanuki, humorously portrayed in block prints are now mostly found in museums and private collections. Tanuki statues are often found in restaurant or shop windows and outside temples. Famous for getting drunk and not paying their bills, they are usually portrayed wearing a straw hat and carrying a flask of sake and a ledger of promissory notes. Thus they can also serve as cautionary figures against the hazards of overindulging in alcohol. They always have big bellies and humorously large testicles which they use as drums. 6" x 8 1/2" x 6 1/2", $345. , thedavidalancollection.com , solana beach, ca
Tanuki with mokugyo bell and prayer beads, dressed as a Monk, mid 20th century, porcelain 6″ x 8 1/2″ x 6 1/2″, $345.

2 Wooden Tanuki in kimonos with abacus, and calling for good luck, Tanuki have a very complex and interesting folkloric history. While largely unheard of in the states, Tanuki have been among the most significant characters in Japan since ancient times. Contemporary Tanuki are primarily a welcoming symbol of prosperity. In the mid 20th century the character was adapted, both visually and symbolically, to suit modern culture and, although they retain much of their prankster persona from the original 16th century creatures, they are much more benign. They have a long list of supernatural powers, most notable shape-shifting. Ancient Tanuki, humorously portrayed in block prints are now mostly found in museums and private collections. Tanuki statues are often found in restaurant or shop windows and outside temples. Famous for getting drunk and not paying their bills, they are usually portrayed wearing a straw hat and carrying a flask of sake and a ledger of promissory notes. Thus they can also serve as cautionary figures against the hazards of overindulging in alcohol. They always have big bellies and humorously large testicles which they use as drums. 5" x 10 1/4" x 7 1/2", sold., thedavidalancollection.com , solana beach, ca
Wooden Tanuki Pair in Kimonos, male with Abacus, female calling for luck, 5″ x 10 1/4″ x 7 1/2″, sold

Some history and origins of the ancient Tanuki folkloric characters. (worth the read)
The character’s namesake is a specie of fox commonly referred to as a raccoon-dog. Mischievous fox characters appear around the world in local indigenous mythologies and Tanuki are no exception. They are said to have a long
list of  preternatural abilities – most notably as masters of shape-shifting.

The original (16th to 18th century) characters were rather sinister, supernatural creatures to be generally avoided. They love to impersonate humans, especially Buddhist monks and political figures. But their shape-shifting abilities are multiform. Not only can they transform themselves into objects; such as stone lanterns, trees, rocks, trains and tea pots, or even the moon, they can also change one object into another.

For instance, they might turn some leaves into paper money, leaving you with a handful of useless forest duff as soon as they are out of sight. They have been known to offer a seemingly alluring meal only to have it turn into manure. …And, they can make people see and hear things that aren’t there – like a fireball or a tunnel in a solid mountainside. They will drum on their big bellies, or other large body parts, to imitate thunder or trains or to make people lose their way, which they really like to do.

Speaking of large body parts, they can expand their scrotum to humorously large proportions for use as a weapon or a tarp-like billowing, multitasking appendage. They are depicted using the versatile appendage for catching fish, as a shade tent on a hot day, as a travois for moving house, as a disguise or a myriad of surprisingly useful applications.
The oniric Tanuki of ancient times can be seen in marvelous old block prints, now mostly in museums and private collections.

More Tanuki Trivia:
Going back into the history of the actual wild Tanuki fox, one will discover the origin of the bizarre proportions of the character version’s scrotum – said to be able to stretch to the size of 8 tatami mats. The wild fox, by the way, has totally normal sized boy parts. The legendary over-sized sack comes from the ancient Japanese goldsmith’s method of using Tanuki pelts (leather) to hammer gold into gold leaf.

As a small gold nougat is pounded impossibly thin, it must be wrapped in something to protect it. That something had to be strong enough to stretch with the gold. While it isn’t clear how Tanuki fox leather was chosen in particular for this task, it became the standard of the trade. It began to be said, that as it could stretch gold, so it could stretch your wealth… and Tanuki scrotum skin wallets became popular. 
We hope you enjoyed our Tanuki trivia !