Vintage Kashigata: Traditional Hand Carved Wooden Confectionary Molds

Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Two part kashigata (sweet cake molds) with the top covers off to best show the carvings
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
The same two part molds with the tops covers on

Little sweet cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using these hand carved wooden culinary molds, or ‘Kashigata’. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition in Japan for more than 300 years. 
Like many centuries-old Japanese specialty craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. There is rare demand now for the handmade cakes, and so these artisanal culinary tools have joined the ranks of rapidly disappearing objects of times past. As they are becoming harder to find, they have become quite collectable. They are each one-of-a-kind hand carvings. 
The mold making process begins with preparing or seasoning the wood – most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving to prevent cracking and warping. For generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets.

Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Longevity motif molds – Crane, Bamboo, Lobster

Auspicious symbols play a significant role in Japanese culture. Kashigata are carved into motifs that have specific meaning and purpose. A few shown in our collection are: Longevity – such as Cranes (mythically lives a thousand years), Pine Trees (evergreen) and Lobster (rounded back like the elderly); Bamboo symbolizes Perserverance – the perfect combination of strength and flexibility. The Lotus (images below) stands for Purity and Enlightenment, as such elegance blooms out of the depths of muck and mud. Other motifs have seasonal references while others reflect the changing zeitgeist of different times and eras in history.
Molded sweet cakes are used for weddings, births, new years and other festivities as well as for funerals and more somber events.

Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Lotus seed pod and lotus leaf. The Lotus plant symbolizes purity, prosperity and enlightenment.

The following are individual images with pricing.

Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
The Lobster symbolizes Longevity – the bend in its back is like the hunching over of the elderly. $150.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Lotus Seed Pod – The lotus flower is revered in Japan for its ability to rise from the dirty, murky waters to bloom into a beautiful pure flower. This process symbolizes attaining enlightenment. $190.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
The lotus leaf, like the flower (above) symbolizes purity and enlightenment $130.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Flowers often symbolize joy and rejuvenation $75.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
The Crane motif is a symbol of longevity and good fortune. $130.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
The Crane symbolizes longevity and good fortune. $280.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Bamboo is a symbol of perseverance and prosperity, strength and flexibility, and good luck. $110.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Lotus buds in a pond. The lotus symbolizes purity and enlightenment. As the beautiful delicate flowers grow out of the mud in the bottom of the pond. $290.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Japanese fan design depicting a pine tree – Pine or evergreen is symbolic of longevity and endurance $250.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Japanese fan – An open fan symbolizes widening of wealth $175.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Three food storage Jars $150.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Japanese Flag $120.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Japanese drum with tassels $210.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Food bowl $120.
Vintage Japanese Kashigata: Traditional Wooden Confectionery Molds Little cakes (Higashi) are made individually for tea ceremonies, events and shrine offerings. They are shaped into objects of art and symbolism using hand carved wooden molds called Kashigata. The rice flour and sugar confections have been a popular tradition for more than 300 years. Like many centuries old Japanese craft traditions, kashigata carving is a fading art. Now there is only rare demand for the specialty cakes. The artizanal sweet molds have joined the ranks of rapidly dissapearing objects of times past. The beautiful confectionery tools are now sought after as collectable wood carvings. The mold making process begings with preparing the wood - most commonly Mountain Cherry, Ginko, and Camllia, which is cured for three years before carving. And for generations, kashigata craftsmen have produced an extensive range of imagery and symbolism that imparts the spirit of the carver and the mystery of natural and supernatural symbolism, into a tradition of handmade, delicate Japanese sweets. Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found around the world - for example: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’.
Food bowl $75.

Specialty molded cakes are a part of a confectionery culture found independantly in many countries around the world. Each culture’s style is unique and the Kashitgata molds are specific to Japan. A few examples from around the world are: Mexican ‘Sugar Skulls’, French ‘Madeleines’, Scottish ‘Shortbread’, Russian ‘Oreshki’, and Middle Eastern ‘Ma’amoul’. There are many more examples and a vast range of motifs, uses and meanings.
Beyond their use as tools to make little molded cakes, Japanese Kashigata are wonderful little works of art and history. Please ask us for more information and to see the rest of our collection.

Vintage Kimonos – A Vanishing Art Finds Its Way Into Modern Fashion

Vintage, authentic hand woven and hand painted, dyed and brocade Japanese kimonos. Wide selection of women's, mens's, fancy and casual wear.
Kimonos are now seen in the top fashion trends. Brook in a vintage kimono worn as coat

One of the Finest Japanese Traditions, the iconic, ancient kimono has charmed its way into the high fashion and street fashion worlds outside of Japan. We love kimonos and delight in promoting this creative fashion trend. Come see our fabulous Kimono and Obi (kimono belt/sash) collection. We have hundreds of hand made, one-of-a-kind beauties.  
David sources our extensive inventory of authentic vintage kimonos in Kyoto, a city once renowned for its kimono makers.

Vintage, authentic hand woven and hand painted, dyed and brocade Japanese kimonos. Wide selection of women's, mens's, fancy and casual wear.
Justin, David and Yukio preparing for our first Kimono party

It is increasingly popular to wear them as coats, over jeans or skirts, or as robes, all highlighting the fabulous vintage fabrics. (see a previous post on our new line of Vintage Kimono Fabric Bags! and look for more to come.)

Vintage, authentic hand woven and hand painted, dyed and brocade Japanese kimonos. Wide selection of women's, mens's, fancy and casual wear.
Sophie in a red silk haori kimono coat, worn open as a casual light jacket
Brook in a silk haori kimono coat
Vintage, authentic hand woven and hand painted, dyed and brocade Japanese kimonos. Wide selection of women's, mens's, fancy and casual wear.
Angie’s favorite haori kimono coat with elegant fan design
Vintage, authentic hand woven and hand painted, dyed and brocade Japanese kimonos. Wide selection of women's, mens's, fancy and casual wear.
Brook in a vintage silk kimono worn as a robe.

Kimonos are exquisite and iconic garments as well as enduring works of art. Like many highly developed and perfected ancient crafts, kimono making is sadly a quickly vanishing trade. The intricate and exceedingly accomplished and centuries old techniques of hand weaving, dying, painting, and embroidering silks are rarely practiced now making the vintage beauties highly sought after. Below – see two gorgeous silk shibori (micro tie die) haori (short kimono) jackets.

Vintage, authentic hand woven and hand painted, dyed and brocade Japanese kimonos. Wide selection of women's, mens's, fancy and casual wear.
Sandra and Jean in silk shibori haori coats
Vintage, authentic hand woven and hand painted, dyed and brocade Japanese kimonos. Wide selection of women's, mens's, fancy and casual wear.
Jean showing hidden lining, often intricately detailed, of a hand embroidered haori coat

Now worn only for special occasions in Japan, one could lament the loss of an elegant tradition that embodied the culture for hundreds of years. But, departure from custom brings a freedom that begs creative movement and propels the past delightfully into the future.

Vintage, authentic hand woven and hand painted, dyed and brocade Japanese kimonos. Wide selection of women's, mens's, fancy and casual wear.
Brook in a vintage silk haori coat
Japanese traditional Fireman's Hanten Coat, or Utility Jacket. It is a heavy durable hand woven fabric and Indigo dyed. It often has a symbol on the back which would be the name of the district's fire brigade. Additional writing on the front would tell more about that brigade. this one is about 70 years old, vintage but unused and in perfect condition.
David wearing a traditional Japanese vintage fireman’s ‘Hanten’ or kimono style jacket.
Japanese traditional Fireman's Hanten Coat, or Utility Jacket. It is a heavy durable hand woven fabric and Indigo dyed. It often has a symbol on the back which would be the name of the district's fire brigade. Additional writing on the front would tell more about that brigade. this one is about 70 years old, vintage but unused and in perfect condition.

David Alan sporting a Japanese traditional Fireman’s ‘Hanten’ Coat, or Utility Jacket. It is a heavy, durable and comfortable fabric which is hand woven and indigo dyed. A fireman’s coat will typically have a symbol on the back which would be the name of the district’s fire brigade. Additional writing on the front would tell more about that brigade. This jacket is about 70 years old, vintage but unused, and in excellent condition.

Vintage, authentic hand woven and hand painted, dyed and brocade Japanese kimonos. Wide selection of women's, mens's, fancy and casual wear.
Jim checking out some silk hakama pants
Vintage, authentic hand woven and hand painted, dyed and brocade Japanese kimonos. Wide selection of women's, mens's, fancy and casual wear.
Julia in a silk michiyuki kimono jacket
Vintage, authentic hand woven and hand painted, dyed and brocade Japanese kimonos. Wide selection of women's, mens's, fancy and casual wear.
Sophie wearing a silk botanical design haori kimono coat
Vintage, authentic hand woven and hand painted, dyed and brocade Japanese kimonos. Wide selection of women's, mens's, fancy and casual wear.
Sophie wearing a silk kimono as a coat
Vintage, authentic hand woven and hand painted, dyed and brocade Japanese kimonos. Wide selection of women's, mens's, fancy and casual wear.
Jean in a batik motif silk haori coat

The kimono epitomizes ancient Japan at first glance. For centuries they were the only style of clothing worn. After WWII came western influences that brought shirts and jeans. They were easier to put on, cheaper, much less restrictive and caught on quickly. 

Vintage, authentic hand woven and hand painted, dyed and brocade Japanese kimonos. Wide selection of women's, mens's, fancy and casual wear.
Two Lovely Ladies in traditional dress at our first Kimono Party, Yukiko (right) who helped organize the event, and friend.
Vintage, authentic hand woven and hand painted, dyed and brocade Japanese kimonos. Wide selection of women's, mens's, fancy and casual wear.
Trying on Kimonos at the party
Vintage, authentic hand woven and hand painted, dyed and brocade Japanese kimonos. Wide selection of women's, mens's, fancy and casual wear.
Enjoying a refreshment break while shopping for kimonos

The word kimono literally means garment, and although the word is simple, the garment itself is deeply complex both in form and in representation. There are many different styles, fabric types and patterns which have a language to themselves. One could glean everything from marital and social status, to seasons and the type of activity or event they are designed for. The styles range from extremely formal to casual. Traditionally they are always wrapped left over right except when dressing the dead.
We Also have some children’s kimonos – which are a lot of fun to play in when not being worn in a traditional manner.

Vintage, authentic hand woven and hand painted, dyed and brocade Japanese kimonos. Wide selection of women's, mens's, fancy and casual wear.
Evelyn in a warm padded kimono vest
Vintage, authentic hand woven and hand painted, dyed and brocade Japanese kimonos. Wide selection of women's, mens's, fancy and casual wear.
Evelyn, back detail
Vintage, authentic hand woven and hand painted, dyed and brocade Japanese kimonos. Wide selection of women's, mens's, fancy and casual wear.
Julian modeling a silk kimono in front of a full moon carving
Vintage, authentic hand woven and hand painted, dyed and brocade Japanese kimonos. Wide selection of women's, mens's, fancy and casual wear.
Little Red Silk Kimono
Vintage, authentic hand woven and hand painted, dyed and brocade Japanese kimonos. Wide selection of women's, mens's, fancy and casual wear.
Red kimono in the garden
The word kimono literally means garment, and although the word is simple, the garment itself is very complex both in form and in representation. The many different styles, fabric types and patterns have a language to themselves. One can glean everything from marital and social status, to seasons and the type of activity or event they are designed for. The styles range from extremely formal to casual. Traditionally they are wrapped left over right except when dressing the dead.
Jayden in a kimono vest

Japanese Kimono Fabric Accessories. From Vintage to Modern – Introducing Our New Line of Custom Designs Bags.

vintage kimono accessory, assorted computer cases, shoulder, clutch and coin purses and travel bags, thedavidalancollection.com , solana beach, ca

Vintage Kimono Accessories

We’ve started a cool new project! Japanese kimonos are made of such spectacular textiles we decided to up-cycle some of our favorites for a new line of lively Computer cases, Travel Bags and Shoulder, Clutch and Coin Purses. The vintage textiles add a spirited flair to modern accessories. We are so happy with them, there are more on our design table. The handwoven silk and cotton fabrics are from some of the many authentic, vintage Japanese Kimonos we always have in our gallery store.

vintage kimono accessory, assorted computer cases, shoulder, clutch and coin purses and travel bags, thedavidalancollection.com , solana beach, ca

Vintage kimono and obi (kimono sash) fabric clutch purses – folded with two zippered compartments. And small and medium size coin purses. Small coin is ample size for credit card etc..

vintage kimono accessory, assorted computer cases, shoulder, clutch and coin purses and travel bags, thedavidalancollection.com , solana beach, ca

Vintage kimono fabric purses in two sizes, with shoulder straps and magnetic clasps. Many more fabrics available. 

vintage kimono accessory, assorted computer cases, shoulder, clutch and coin purses and travel bags, thedavidalancollection.com , solana beach, ca

Vintage kimono fabric padded computer and ipad/tablet size cases.

vintage kimono accessory, assorted computer cases, shoulder, clutch and coin purses and travel bags, thedavidalancollection.com , solana beach, ca

More computer cases

Vintage, authentic Japanese kimonos. Wide selection of women's, mens's, fancy and everyday wear. thedavidalancollection.com , solana beach, ca

Authentic, vintage Japanese kimonos. This is just the tip of the iceberg from our collection of women’s and men’s, elegant to everyday-wear robes and jackets. Most are silk or cotton. Many are hand embroidered, hand painted and of course some amazing shibori . All price ranges – from $10. to museum quality art pieces.

Vintage, authentic Japanese kimonos. Wide selection of women's, mens's, fancy and everyday wear. thedavidalancollection.com , solana beach, ca

Authentic, vintage Japanese kimonos on our front patio